วัดนักบุญฟรังซีสเซเวียร์ สามเสน

Tuesday, November 18th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Luke 19:1-10.


Tuesday of the Thirty-third week in Ordinary Time

18 November 2014

Jesus looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, come down quickly,

for today I must stay at your house.”

1 Short man wjpas0767

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 19:1-10. 

At that time, Jesus came to Jericho and intended to pass through the town.
Now a man there named Zacchaeus, who was a chief tax collector and also a wealthy man,
was seeking to see who Jesus was; but he could not see him because of the crowd, for he was short in stature.
So he ran ahead and climbed a sycamore tree in order to see Jesus, who was about to pass that way.
When he reached the place, Jesus looked up and said to him, “Zacchaeus, come down quickly, for today I must stay at your house.”
And he came down quickly and received him with joy.
When they all saw this, they began to grumble, saying, “He has gone to stay at the house of a sinner.”
But Zacchaeus stood there and said to the Lord, “Behold, half of my possessions, Lord, I shall give to the poor, and if I have extorted anything from anyone I shall repay it four times over.”
And Jesus said to him, “Today salvation has come to this house because this man too is a descendant of Abraham.
For the Son of Man has come to seek and to save what was lost.”

#####################################################################################################

Tuesday of the Thirty-third week in Ordinary Time

18 November 2014

Saints of the day

St. Rose Philippine Duchesne,

Religious (1769-1852)

1 Santa_Filippina_Rosa_Duchesne

Rose Philippine Duchesne
Religious, of the Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus 
(1769-1852)

       Rose Philippine Duchesne was born August 29, 1769 in Grenoble, France. She was baptized in the Church of St. Louis and received the name of Philip, the apostle, and Rose of Lima, first saint of the new continent. She was educated at the Convent of the Visitation of Ste. Marie d’en Haut, then, drawn to the contemplative life, she became a novice there when she was 18 years old.

        At the time of the Revolution in France, the community was dispersed and Philippine returned to her family home, spending her time nursing prisoners and helping others who suffered. After the Concordat of 1801, she tried with some companions to reconstruct the monastery of Ste. Marie but without success.

        In 1804, Philippine learned of a new congregation, the Society of the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and offered herself and the monastery to the Foundress, Mother Madeleine Sophie Barat. Mother Barat visited Ste. Marie in 1804 and received Philippine and several companions as novices in the Society.

        Even as Philippine’s desire deepened for the contemplative life, so too her call to the missions became more  urgent – a call she had heard since her youth. In a letter she wrote to Mother Barat, she confided a spiritual experience she had had during a night of adoration before the Eucharist on Holy Thursday: “I spent the entire night in the new World … carrying the Blessed Sacrament to all parts of the land … I had all my sacrifices to offer: a mother, sisters, family, my mountain! When you say to me ‘now I send you’, I will respond quickly ‘I go”‘. She waited, however, another 12 years.

        In 1818 Philippine’s dream was realized. She was sent to respond to the bishop of the Louisiana territory, who was looking for a congregation of educators to help him evangelize the Indian and French children of his diocese. At St. Charles, near St. Louis, Missouri, she founded the first house of the Society outside France. It was in a log cabin – and with it came all the austerities of frontier life: extreme cold, hard work, lack of funds. She also had difficulty learning English. Communication at best was slow; news often did not arrive from her beloved France. She struggled to remain closely united with the Society in France.

        Philippine and four other Religious of the Sacred Heart forged ahead. In 1820 she opened the first free school west of the Mississippi. By 1828 she had founded six houses. These schools were for the young women of Missouri and Louisiana. She loved and served them well, but always in her heart she yearned to serve the American Indians. When she was 72 and no longer superior, a school for the Potawatomi was opened at Sugar Creek, Kansas. Though many thought Philippine was too sick to go, the Jesuit head of the mission insisted: “She must come; she may not be able to do much work, but she will assure success to the mission by praying for us. Her very presence will draw down all manner of heavenly favors on the work”.

        She was with the Potawatomi but a year; however, her pioneer courage did not weaken, and her long hours of contemplation impelled the Indians to name her, Quah-kah-ka-num-ad,
“Woman-Who-Prays-Always”. But Philippine’s health could not sustain the regime of village life. In July 1842, she returned to St. Charles, although her heart never lost its desire for the missions: “I feel the same longing for the Rocky Mountain missions and any others like them, that I experienced in France when I first begged to come to America…”.

        Philippine died at St. Charles, Missouri, November 18, 1852 at the age of 83.

© Copyright 2000 – Libreria Editrice Vaticana

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

#####################################################################################################

Tuesday of the Thirty-third week in Ordinary Time

18 November 2014

Dedication of the Basilicas

Dedication of the Basilicas of Sts. Peter & Paul

1 Dedicazione_delle_basiliche_dei_Santi_Pietro_e_Paolo_B

Dedication of the Basilicas
of the Apostles
Peter and Paul
in Rome

        Among the holy places venerated by the Christians from the beginning, the chief has always been the Confession of St. Peter on Vatican Hill,  hallowed by the tomb of the Prince of the Apostles. Here the Emperor Constantine is said to have come and, taking a shovel and a two-pronged fork, to have broken the sod to designate the site of the basilica which he built at his own expense. Pope Sylvester dedicated it on the fourteenth of the Calends of December and decreed that from that time henceforth all altars must be of stone. In later years when it became ruinous with age, it was rebuilt from the foundations through the piety and zeal of several Pontiffs. Urban VIII solemnly dedicated it on this same day in the year 1626.

        Sylvester, likewise, dedicated the basilica of St. Paul the Apostle on the Ostian Way. It had been most sumptuously built by the same Emperor Constantine. After it was completely destroyed by fire, it was rebuilt more magnificently than before through the tireless efforts of four Pontiffs. Pius IX, taking advantage of the most auspicious occasion of the definition of the dogma of the Immaculate Conception of the Blessed Virgin Mary, surrounded by a host of bishops, solemnly consecrated it.

O God,
who for us bring each year
the recurrence of the consecration day of this your holy temple,
and always bring us back safely to the sacred rites,
hear the payers of your people
and grant that whoever enters this temple to pray for blessings,
may rejoice in having obtained whatever he sought.

Roman Breviary – Benziger Brothers, 1964

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

#####################################################################################################

Tuesday of the Thirty-third week in Ordinary Time

18 November 2014

Saints of the day

St. Odo of Cluny

(† 942)

1 Odo_Cluny-11

SAINT ODO OF CLUNY
(† 942)

        On Christmas-eve, 877, a noble of Aquitaine implored Our Lady to grant him a son. His prayer was heard; Odo was born, and his grateful father offered him to St. Martin. Odo grew in wisdom and in virtue, and his father longed to see him shine at court. But the attraction of grace was too strong. Odo’s heart was sad and his health failed, until he forsook the world and sought refuge under the shadow of St. Martin at Tours.

        Later on he took the habit of St. Benedict at Baume, and was compelled to become abbot of the great abbey of Cluny, which was then building. He ruled it with the hand of a master and the winningness of a Saint.

        The Pope sent for him often to act as peacemaker between contending princes, and it was on one of those missions of mercy that he was taken ill at Rome. At his urgent entreaty he was borne back to Tours, where he died at the feet of «his own St. Martin,” in 942.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s