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Monday, June 1st. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Mark 12:1-12.


Monday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

1 June 2015

‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’

1 wineyard stdas0150

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Mark 12:1-12.

Jesus began to speak to the chief priests, the scribes, and the elders in parables. “A man planted a vineyard, put a hedge around it, dug a wine press, and built a tower. Then he leased it to tenant farmers and left on a journey.
At the proper time he sent a servant to the tenants to obtain from them some of the produce of the vineyard.
But they seized him, beat him, and sent him away empty-handed.
Again he sent them another servant. And that one they beat over the head and treated shamefully.
He sent yet another whom they killed. So, too, many others; some they beat, others they killed.
He had one other to send, a beloved son. He sent him to them last of all, thinking, ‘They will respect my son.’
But those tenants said to one another, ‘This is the heir. Come, let us kill him, and the inheritance will be ours.’
So they seized him and killed him, and threw him out of the vineyard.
What (then) will the owner of the vineyard do? He will come, put the tenants to death, and give the vineyard to others.
Have you not read this scripture passage: ‘The stone that the builders rejected has become the cornerstone;
by the Lord has this been done, and it is wonderful in our eyes’?”
They were seeking to arrest him, but they feared the crowd, for they realized that he had addressed the parable to them. So they left him and went away.

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Monday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

1 June 2015

Commentary of the day

John Tauler

 St-Pierre-le-Jeune protestant-Tauler (2).jpg
John Tauler (c.1300-1361), Dominican
Sermon 7

Become a vine that bears fruit

 As for vines, we bind them, tie them to posts, bend the branches over and attach them to stout stakes to hold them. By this we can understand the sweet and holy life and Passion of our Lord Jesus Christ who, in everything, is to be the support of the well-meaning person. Such a person has to be bent over, what is highest in him has to be brought low and he has to go down in true, humble submission from the depth of his heart. All our interior and exterior faculties, the sensitive and acquisitive as well as our rational ones, have to be bound in their place, in true submission to the will of God.

Next we turn over the earth at the foot of the vine and hoe up the weeds. This is how a person has to hoe himself, giving profound attention to what might still remain to pull up from deep within himself, so that the divine Sun may come right up close and shine there. So if you allow the power from on high to carry out its work in it, the sun will draw up the humidity from the soil into the sap hidden in the wood and the bunches will grow magnificently. Then, with its heat, the sun acts on the bunches and causes them to burst into flower and these flowers have a noble and wholesome scent… Then the fruit becomes indescribably sweet. Oh, may this be granted to all of us!

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

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Monday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

1 June 2015

Saints of the day

St. Justin, Martyr (+ c. 165) – Memorial

1 ST JUSTIN untitled

SAINT JUSTIN
Martyr
(+ c. 165)

        St. Justin was born of heathen parents at. Neapolis in Samaria, about the year 103. He was well educated, and gave himself to the study of philosophy, but always with one object, that he might learn the knowledge of God. He sought this knowledge among the contending schools of philosophy, but always in vain, till at last God himself appeased the thirst which He had created.

One day, while Justin was walking by the seashore, meditating on the thought of God, an old man met him and questioned him on the subject of his doubts; and when he had made Justin confess that the philosophers taught nothing certain about God, he told him of the writings of the inspired prophets and of Jesus Christ whom they announced, and bade him seek light and understanding through prayer.

The Scriptures and the constancy of the Christian martyrs led Justin from the darkness of human reason to the light of faith. In his zeal for the Faith he travelled to Greece, Egypt, and Italy, gaining many to Christ.

At Rome he sealed his testimony with his blood, surrounded by his disciples. “Do you think,” the prefect said to Justin, “that by dying you will enter heaven, and be rewarded by God?” “I do not think,” was the Saint’s answer; “I know.”

        Then, as now, there were many religious opinions, but only one certain-the certainty of the Catholic faith. This certainty should be the measure of our confidence and our zeal.
Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

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Monday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

1 June 2015

Saints of the day

St. Pamphilus, Priest & Martyr (+ 308)

1 ST PAM AND OTHERS untitled

SAINT PAMPHILUS
Priest and Martyr
(+ 308)

         St. Pamphilus was of a rich and honorable family, and a native of Berytus, in which city, at that time famous for its schools, he in his youth ran through the whole circle of the sciences, and was afterward honored with the first employments of the magistracy.

After he began to know Christ, he could relish no other study but that of salvation, and renounced everything else that he might apply himself wholly to the exercise of virtue and the studies of the Holy Scriptures. This accomplished master in profane sciences, and this renowned magistrate, was not ashamed to become the humble scholar of Pierius, the successor of Origen, in the great catechetical school of Alexandria.

   He afterward made Cæsarea, in Palestine, his residence, where, at his private expense, he collected a great library, which he bestowed on the church of that city. The Saint established there also a public school of sacred literature, and to his labors the Church was indebted for a most correct edition of the Holy Bible, which, with infinite care, he transcribed himself.

But nothing was more remarkable in this Saint than his extraordinary humility. His paternal estate he at length distributed among the poor; towards his slaves and domestics his behavior was always that of a brother or a tender father. He led a most austere life, sequestered from the world and its company, and was indefatigable in labor.

        Such a virtue was his apprenticeship to the grace of martyrdom. In the year 307, Urbanus, the cruel governor of Palestine, caused him to be apprehended, and commanded him to be most inhumanly tormented. But the iron hooks which tore the martyr’s sides served only to cover the judge with confusion. After this, the Saint remained almost two years in prison. Urbanus, the governor, was himself beheaded by an order of the Emperor Maximinus, but was succeeded by Firmilian, a man not less barbarous than bigoted and superstitious.

        After several butcheries, he caused St. Pamphilus to be brought before him, and passed sentence of death upon him. His flesh was torn off to the very bones, and his bowels exposed to view, and the torments were continued a long time without intermission, but he never once opened his mouth so much as to groan.

He finished his martyrdom by a slow fire, and died invoking Jesus, the Son of God.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

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