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Thursday, June 4th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Mark 12:28-34.


Thursday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

4 June 2015

You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart,

with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’
1 fishermen lwjas0358

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Mark 12:28-34. 

One of the scribes came to Jesus and asked him, “Which is the first of all the commandments?”
Jesus replied, “The first is this: ‘Hear, O Israel! The Lord our God is Lord alone!
You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart, with all your soul, with all your mind, and with all your strength.’
The second is this: ‘You shall love your neighbor as yourself.’ There is no other commandment greater than these.”
The scribe said to him, “Well said, teacher. You are right in saying, ‘He is One and there is no other than he.’
And ‘to love him with all your heart, with all your understanding, with all your strength, and to love your neighbor as yourself’ is worth more than all burnt offerings and sacrifices.”
And when Jesus saw that (he) answered with understanding, he said to him, “You are not far from the kingdom of God.” And no one dared to ask him any more questions.

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Thursday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

4 June 2015

Commentary of the day

Saint Bernard (1091-1153),

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 Saint Bernard (1091-1153),

Cistercian monk and doctor of the Church
Treatise on the Love of God, chapters 8-10

“You shall love the Lord your God with all your heart”

  

The first and greatest commandment is this: “You shall love the Lord your God.” But our nature is weak. In us, the first degree of love is to love ourselves before anything else, for ourselves… In order to prevent us from sliding too far down on that slope, God gave us the precept to love our neighbor as ourselves… But we see that this is not possible without God, without recognizing that everything comes from him and that without him, we can do absolutely nothing. So at this second degree, the human being turns to God, but so far he only loves God for himself and not for God…

But you would have to have a heart of stone or metal not to be touched by the help which God gives us when we turn to him in trials. In times of trial, it is impossible for us not to taste how good he is (Ps 34:9). And quickly, we begin to love him more because of the goodness we find in him, rather than for the sake of our own interests… When we have arrived at this point, it is not difficult to love our neighbor as ourselves… We love the others as we are loved, as Jesus Christ loved us. That is the love of the person who says with the psalmist: “Give thanks to the Lord, for he is good.” (Ps 118:1) Give thanks to the Lord, not because he is good to us, but simply because he is good, love God for God and not for ourselves. That is the third degree of love.

Happy are they who were able to rise up to the fourth degree of love: to no longer love themselves except for love of God… When will my soul, drunken with the love of God, forgetting itself, considering itself as nothing more than a broken vessel, when will it rush to God in order to lose itself in him and to no longer be anything but one single spirit with him (1 Cor 6:17)? When will it be able to cry out: “Though my flesh and my heart waste away, God is the rock of my heart and my portion forever” (Ps 73:26)? Holy and happy are they who could experience something like that during this mortal life, even though rarely, even though only once. That is not a human happiness, it is already to dwell in heaven.

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

Image: From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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Thursday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

4 June 2015

Saints of the day

St. Francis Caracciolo, Co-Founder (1563-1608)

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ST. FRANCIS CARACCIOLO
Priest and co-founder  of the Congregation of the Minor Clerics Regular
(1563-1608)

        Francis was born in the kingdom of Naples, of the princely family of Caracciolo. In childhood he shunned all amusements, recited the Rosary regularly, and loved to visit the Blessed Sacrament and to distribute his food to the poor. An attack of leprosy taught him the vileness of the human body and the vanity of the world.

       Almost miraculously cured, he renounced his home to study for the priesthood at Naples, where he spent his leisure hours in the prisons or visiting the Blessed Sacrament in unfrequented churches. God called him, when only twenty-five, to found an Order of Clerks Regular, whose rule was that each day one father fasted on bread and water, another took the discipline, a third wore a hair-shirt, while they always watched by turns in perpetual adoration before the Blessed Sacrament. They took the usual vows, adding a fourth-not to desire dignities. To establish his Order, Francis undertook many journeys through Italy and Spain, on foot and without money, content with the shelter and crusts given him in charity. Being elected general, he redoubled his austerities, and devoted seven hours daily to meditation on the Passion, besides passing most of the night praying before the Blessed Sacrament. Francis was commonly called the Preacher of Divine Love. But it was before the Blessed Sacrament that his ardent devotion was most clearly perceptible. In presence of his divine Lord his face usually emitted brilliant rays of light; and he often bathed the ground with his tears when he prayed, according to his custom, prostrate on his face before the tabernacle, and constantly repeating, as one devoured by internal fire, “The zeal of Thy house hath eaten me up.”

        He died of fever, aged forty-four, on the eve of Corpus Christi, 1608, saying, “Let us go, let us go to heaven!” When his body was opened after death, his heart was found as it were burnt up, and these words imprinted around it: “Zelus domus Tuæ comedit me”-“The zeal of Thy house hath eaten me up.”

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

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Thursday of the Ninth week in Ordinary Time

4 June 2015

Saints of the day

St. Clotilda, Queen (476-545)

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SAINT CLOTILDA
Queen
(476-545)

        St. Clotilda was daughter of Chilperic, younger brother to Gondebald, the tyrannical King of Burgundy, who put him and his wife, and his other brothers, except one, to death, in order to usurp their dominions. Clotilda was brought up in her uncle’s court, and, by a singular providence, was instructed in the Catholic religion, though she was educated in the midst of Arians.

  Her wit, beauty, meekness, modesty, and piety made her the adoration of all the neighboring kingdoms, and Clovis I., surnamed the Great, the victorious king of the Franks, demanded and obtained her in marriage. She honored her royal husband, studied to sweeten his warlike temper by Christian meekness, conformed herself to his humor in things that were indifferent, and, the better to gain his affections, made those things the subject of her discourse and praises in which she knew him to take the greatest delight.

When she saw herself mistress of his heart she did not defer the great work of endeavoring to win him to God, but the fear of giving offence to his people made him delay his conversion. His miraculous victory over the Alemanni, and his entire conversion in 496, were at length the fruit of our Saint’s prayers. Clotilda, having gained to God this great monarch, never ceased to excite him to glorious actions for the divine honor; among other religious foundations, he built in Paris, at her request, about the year 511, the great church of Sts. Peter and Paul, now called St. Genevieve’s.

    This great prince died on the 27th of November, in the year 511, at the age of forty-five, having reigned thirty years. His eldest son, Theodoric, reigned at Rheims over the eastern parts of France, Clodomir reigned at Orleans, Childebert at Paris, and Clotaire I. at Soissons. This division produced wars and mutual jealousies, till in 560 the whole monarchy was reunited under Clotaire, the youngest of these brothers.

The dissension in her family contributed more perfectly to wean Clotilda’s heart from the world. She spent the remaining part of her life in exercises of prayer, almsdeeds, watching, fasting, and penance, seeming totally to forget that she had been queen or that her sons sat on the throne. Eternity filled her heart and employed all her thoughts.

        She foretold her death thirty days before it happened. On the thirtieth day of her illness, she received the sacraments, made a public confession of her faith, and departed to the Lord on June 4, 545.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2015

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