วัดนักบุญฟรังซีสเซเวียร์ สามเสน

Saturday, January 23rd. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Mark 3:20-21.


Saturday of the Second week in Ordinary Time

23 January 2016

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ

Again the crowd gathered, making it impossible

for them even to eat.

1 stdas0161

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Mark 3:20-21.

Jesus came with his disciples into the house. Again the crowd gathered, making it impossible for them even to eat.
When his relatives heard of this they set out to seize him, for they said, “He is out of his mind.”

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

Image: From Biblehub

DAILY MASS – Saturday 23 January 2016

______________________________________

Saturday of the Second week in Ordinary Time

23 January 2016

Commentary of the day

Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274),

AQUINA 330px-Benozzo_Gozzoli_004a

Saint Thomas Aquinas (1225-1274),
Dominican theologian, Doctor of the Church
Opuscule for the Feast of Corpus Christi (trans. Breviary)

Jesus gives himself wholly : he gives his own self to eat

The only-begotten Son of God, wishing to enable us to share in his divinity, assumed our nature, so that by becoming man he might make men gods. Moreover, he turned the whole of our nature, which he assumed, to our salvation. For he offered his body to God the Father on the altar of the cross as a sacrifice for our reconciliation; and he shed his blood for our ransom and our cleansing, so that we might be redeemed from wretched captivity and cleansed from all sins.

Now in order that we might always keep the memory of his great act of love, he left his body as food and his blood as drink, to be received by the faithful under the appearances of bread and wine… What could be more precious than this banquet? It is not the meat of calves or kids that is offered, as happened under the Old Law; at this meal Christ, the true God, is set before us for us to eat. What could be more wonderful than this sacrament?…  No one is capable of expressing the delight of this sacrament, through which the sweetness of the Spirit is tasted at its source, and the memory is celebrated of that surpassing love which Christ showed in his Passion.

And so, in order to imprint the immensity of this love more deeply in the hearts of the faithful, at the Last Supper, when the Lord had celebrated the Pasch with his disciples and was about to pass from this world to his Father, he instituted this sacrament as a perpetual memorial of his Passion. It fulfilled the types of the Old Law; it was the greatest of the miracles he worked; and he left it as a unique consolation to those who were desolate at his departure.

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

Image:From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

___________________________________

Saturday of the Second week in Ordinary Time

23 January 2016

Saints of the day

St. John the Almoner,

Patriarch of Alexandria (+ c. 620)

San_Giovanni_lElemosiniere_E

SAINT JOHN THE ALMONER
Patriarch of Alexandria
(+ c. 620)

        St. John was married, but when his wife and two children died he considered it a call from God to lead a perfect life. He began to give away all he possessed in alms, and became known throughout the East as the Almoner. He was appointed Patriarch of Alexandria; but before he would take possession of his see he told his servants to go over the town and bring him a list of his lords-meaning the poor. They brought word that there were seventy-five hundred of them, and these he undertook to feed every day.

        On Wednesday and Friday in every week he sat on a bench before the church, to hear the complaints of the needy and aggrieved; nor would he permit his servants to taste food until their wrongs were redressed. The fear of death was ever before him, and he never spoke an idle word. He turned those out of church whom he saw talking, and forbade all detractors to enter his house. He left seventy churches in Alexandria, where he had found but seven.

        A merchant received from St. John five pounds weight of gold to buy merchandise. Having suffered shipwreck and lost all, he had again recourse to John, who said, “Some of your merchandise was ill-gotten,” and gave him ten pounds more; but the next voyage he lost ship as well as goods. John then said, “The ship was wrongfully acquired. Take fifteen pounds of gold, buy corn with it, and put it on one of my ships.” This time the merchant was carried by the winds without his own knowledge to England, where there was a famine; and he sold the corn for its weight in tin, and on his return he found the tin changed to finest silver.

St. John died in Cyprus, his native place, about the year 620.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]
©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

_______________________________

Saturday of the Second week in Ordinary Time

23 January 2016

Saints of the day

St. Marianne Cope

Mother Marianne Cope is pictured in an undated file photo. Pope John Paul II moved the Franciscan nun's cause for sainthood forward April 19 in a decree attesting to her "heroic virtues." Mother Cope was the first U.S. missionary to work among patients with Hansen's disease in the Hawaiian Islands. She also took over the ministry of Blessed Damien de Veuster on the island of Molokai after he died of the disease in 1889. (CNS photo courtesy Hawaii Catholic Herald) (April 19, 2004) See COPE-SAINTHOOD April 19, 2004. (b/w only)

Mother Marianne Cope is pictured in an undated file photo. Pope John Paul II moved the Franciscan nun’s cause for sainthood forward April 19 in a decree attesting to her “heroic virtues.” Mother Cope was the first U.S. missionary to work among patients with Hansen’s disease in the Hawaiian Islands. She also took over the ministry of Blessed Damien de Veuster on the island of Molokai after he died of the disease in 1889. (CNS photo courtesy Hawaii Catholic Herald) (April 19, 2004) See COPE-SAINTHOOD April 19, 2004. (b/w only)

St. Marianne Cope
Religious (1838 – 1918)

Though leprosy scared off most people in 19th-century Hawaii, that disease sparked great generosity in the woman who came to be known as Mother Marianne of Molokai. Her courage helped tremendously to improve the lives of its victims in Hawaii, a territory annexed to the United States during her lifetime (1898).

Mother Marianne’s generosity and courage were celebrated at her May 14, 2005, beatification in Rome. She was a woman who spoke “the language of truth and love” to the world, said Cardinal José Saraiva Martins, prefect of the Congregation for Saints’ Causes. Cardinal Martins, who presided at the beatification Mass in St. Peter’s Basilica, called her life “a wonderful work of divine grace.” Speaking of her special love for persons suffering from leprosy, he said, “She saw in them the suffering face of Jesus. Like the Good Samaritan, she became their mother.”

On January 23, 1838, a daughter was born to Peter and Barbara Cope of Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany. The girl was named after her mother. Two years later the Cope family emigrated to the United States and settled in Utica, New York. Young Barbara worked in a factory until August 1862, when she went to the Sisters of the Third Order of Saint Francis in Syracuse, New York. After profession in November of the next year, she began teaching at Assumption parish school.

Marianne held the post of superior in several places and was twice the novice mistress of her congregation. A natural leader, three different times she was superior of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Syracuse, where she learned much that would be useful during her years in Hawaii.

Elected provincial in 1877, Mother Marianne was unanimously re-elected in 1881. Two years later the Hawaiian government was searching for someone to run the Kakaako Receiving Station for people suspected of having leprosy. More than 50 religious communities in the United States and Canada were asked. When the request was put to the Syracuse sisters, 35 of them volunteered immediately. On October 22, 1883, Mother Marianne and six other sisters left for Hawaii where they took charge of the Kakaako Receiving Station outside Honolulu; on the island of Maui they also opened a hospital and a school for girls.

In 1888, Mother Marianne and two sisters went to Molokai to open a home for “unprotected women and girls” there. The Hawaiian government was quite hesitant to send women for this difficult assignment; they need not have worried about Mother Marianne! On Molokai she took charge of the home that St. Damien de Veuster [May 10, d. 1889] had established for men and boys. Mother Marianne changed life on Molokai by introducing cleanliness, pride and fun to the colony. Bright scarves and pretty dresses for the women were part of her approach.

Awarded the Royal Order of Kapiolani by the Hawaiian government and celebrated in a poem by Robert Louis Stevenson, Mother Marianne continued her work faithfully. Her sisters have attracted vocations among the Hawaiian people and still work on Molokai.

In 2005 Cope was beatified by Pope Benedict XVI.[1] Cope was declared a saint by the same pope on October 21, 2012.

AmericanCatholic.org

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

____________________________

PLEASE JOIN

DAILY MASS & SUNDAY MASS

READ

DAILY GOSPEL OF THE LORD JESUS

with

DAILY COMMENTARY OF THE DAY

and

SAINTS OF THE DAY

ALSO READ

NEWSLETTER IN THAI

From

SAINT FRANCIS XAVIER NEWSLETTER IN THAI

THANK YOU

___________________________________

“Go into the whole world and proclaim the Gospel to every creature.”

Mark 16:15-20

*********************************************

“I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

Matthew 28:20.

***********************************************

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s