วัดนักบุญฟรังซีสเซเวียร์ สามเสน

Thursday, March 10th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St John 5:31-47.


Thursday of the Fourth week of Lent

10 March 2016

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ 

For if you had believed Moses, you would have believed me,

because he wrote about me.

jesus wjpas0428

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 5:31-47.

Jesus said to the Jews: «If I testify on my own behalf, my testimony is not true.
But there is another who testifies on my behalf, and I know that the testimony he gives on my behalf is true.
You sent emissaries to John, and he testified to the truth.
I do not accept testimony from a human being, but I say this so that you may be saved.
He was a burning and shining lamp, and for a while you were content to rejoice in his light.
But I have testimony greater than John’s. The works that the Father gave me to accomplish, these works that I perform testify on my behalf that the Father has sent me.
Moreover, the Father who sent me has testified on my behalf. But you have never heard his voice nor seen his form,
and you do not have his word remaining in you, because you do not believe in the one whom he has sent.
You search the scriptures, because you think you have eternal life through them; even they testify on my behalf.
But you do not want to come to me to have life.
I do not accept human praise;
moreover, I know that you do not have the love of God in you.
I came in the name of my Father, but you do not accept me; yet if another comes in his own name, you will accept him.
How can you believe, when you accept praise from one another and do not seek the praise that comes from the only God?
Do not think that I will accuse you before the Father: the one who will accuse you is Moses, in whom you have placed your hope.
For if you had believed Moses, you would have believed me, because he wrote about me.
But if you do not believe his writings, how will you believe my words?”

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

Image: From Biblehub

DAILY MASS – Thursday 10 March 2016 

_____________________________

Thursday of the Fourth week of Lent

10 March 2016

Commentary of the day

Saint Jerome (347-420),

priest, translator of the Bible, Doctor of the Church
Letter 53 to Saint Paulinus, Bishop of Nola

“If you believed in Moses you would then believe me, for it was about me that he wrote.”

There is a “wisdom of God, mysterious and hidden, which God decided in advance, before the ages.” This wisdom of God is Christ. He is “the power of God and the wisdom of God”… For in the Son “all treasures of wisdom and of knowledge are hidden.” Hidden in mystery, decided in advance, before the ages, he was predestined and prefigured in the Law and the Prophets.

That is why the prophets were called “seers”; they saw him who was hidden and unknown to others. Abraham also “saw his day and rejoiced.” For Ezekiel, the heavens opened while the sinful people remained ignorant. David said: “Remove the veil from my eyes, and I will contemplate the marvels of your law.” For the law is spiritual, and to understand it, the veil must be lifted and “the glory of God must be contemplated with unveiled vision.”

In the Book of Revelation, a sealed book with seven seals is shown… How many people today who claim to be educated hold a sealed Book in their hands! And they are incapable of opening it unless it is opened by “him who has the key of David; if he opens, no one will close, and if he closes, no one will open.” In the Acts of the Apostles, the eunuch was reading the prophet Isaiah… However, without knowing him, he was ignorant of him whom he was venerating in that book. Philip came and showed him Jesus hidden under the letter… So understand that you cannot get involved in Holy Scripture without a guide who will show you the way.

(Biblical References: 1 Cor 2:7; 1 Cor 1:24; Col 2:31; 1 Sam 9:9; Jn 8:56; Ps 118:18; 2 Cor 3:16-18; Rev 5:1; Rev 3:7; Acts 8:26ff.)

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

_____________________

Thursday of the Fourth week of Lent

10 March 2016

Saints of the day

St. Marie Eugenie of Jesus,

foundress of the Religious of the Assumption (1817-1898)

Santa_Maria_Eugenia_di_Gesu-Anna_Milleret_de_Brou

Saint Marie Eugenie of Jesus
Foundress of the Religious of the Assumption
(1817 – 1898)

        Anne Marie Eugenie was born in 1817 in Metz after Napoleon’s complete defeat and the restoration of the Monarchy. She belonged to a non-believing and financially comfortable family and it seemed unlikely that she would trace a new spiritual path across the Church of France.

        Her father, follower of Voltaire and a liberal, was making his fortune in the banking world and in politics. Eugenie’s mother provided the sensitive Eugenie with an education, which strengthened her character and gave her a strong sense of duty. Family life developed her intellectual curiosity and a romantic spirit, an interest in social questions and a broad world view.

        Like her contemporary, George Sand, Anne Eugenie went to Mass on feast days and received the Sacraments of initiation, as was the custom but without any real commitment. However, her First Communion was a great mystical experience that foretold the secret of her future. She did not grasp its prophetic meaning until much later when she recognized it as her path towards total belonging to Jesus Christ and the Church.

        Her youth was happy but not without suffering. She was affected when still a child by the death of an elder brother and a baby sister. Her health was delicate and a fall from a horse left serious consequences. Eugenie was mature for her age and learnt how to hide her feelings and to face up to events. Later, after a prosperous period for her father, she experienced the failure of his banks, the misunderstanding and eventual separation of her parents and the loss of all security. She had to leave her family home and go to Paris while Louis, closest to her in age and faithful companion went to live with their father. Eugenie went to Paris with the mother she adored, only to see her die from cholera after a few hours of illness, leaving her alone at the age of fifteen in a society that was worldly and superficial. Searching in anguish and almost desperate for the truth, she arrived at her conversion thirsty for the Absolute and open to the Transcendent.

        When she was nineteen, Anne Eugenie attended the Lenten Conferences at Notre Dame in Paris, preached by the young Abbe Lacordaire, already well-known for his talent as orator. Lacordaire was a former disciple of Lamennais ­- haunted by the vision of a renewed Church with a special place in the world. He understood his time and wanted to change it. He understood young people, their questions and their desires, their idealism and their ignorance of both Christ and the Church. His words touched Eugenie’s heart, answered her many questions, and aroused her generosity. Eugenie envisaged Christ as the universal liberator and his kingdom on earth established as a peaceful and just society. I was truly converted, she wrote, and I was seized by a longing to devote all my strength or rather all my weakness to the Church which, from that moment, I saw as alone holding the key to the knowledge and achievement of all that is good.

        Just at this time, another preacher, also a former disciple of Lamennais, appeared on the scene. In the confessional, Father Combalot recognized that he had encountered a chosen soul who was designated to be the foundress of the Congregation he had dreamt of for a long time. He persuaded Eugenie to undertake his work by insisting that this Congregation was willed by God who had chosen her to establish it. He convinced her that only by education could she evangelize minds, make families truly Christian and thus transform the society of her time. Anne Eugenie accepted the project as God’s will for her and allowed herself to be guided by the Abbe Combalot.

        At twenty-two, Marie Eugenie became foundress of the Religious of the Assumption, dedicated to consecrate their whole life and strength to extending the Kingdom of Christ in themselves and in the world. In 1839, Mademoiselle Eugenie Milleret, with two other young women, began a life of prayer and study in a flat at rue Ferou near the church of St. Sulpice in Paris. In 1841, under the patronage of Madame de Chateaubriand, Lacordaire, Montalembert and their friends, the sisters opened their first school. In a relatively short time there were sixteen sisters of four nationalities in the community.

Marie Eugenie and the first sisters wanted to link the ancient and the new – to unite the past treasures of the Church’s spirituality and wisdom with a type of religious life and education able to satisfy the demands of modern minds. It was a matter of respecting the values of the period and at the same time, making the Gospel values penetrate the rising culture of a new industrial and scientific era. The spirituality of the Congregation, centered on Christ and the Incarnation, was both deeply contemplative and dedicated to apostolic action. It was a life given to the search for God and the love and service of others.

Marie Eugenie’s long life covered almost the whole of the 19th century. She loved her times passionately and took an active part in their history. Progressively, she channeled all her energy and gifts in tending and extending the Congregation, which became her life work. God gave her sisters and many friends. One of the first sisters was Irish, a mystic and her intimate friend whom she called at the end of her life, “half of myself.” Kate O’Neill, called Mother Therese Emmanuel in religion, is considered as a co-foundress. Father Emmanuel d’Alzon, became Marie Eugenie’s spiritual director soon after the foundation, was a father, brother or friend according to the seasons. In 1845, he founded the Augustinians of the Assumption and the two founders helped each other in a multitude of ways over a period of forty years. Both had a gift for friendship and they inspired many lay people to work with them and the Church. Together, as they followed Christ and labored with him, the religious and laity traced the path of the Assumption and took their place in the great cloud of witnesses.

In the last years of her life, Mother Marie Eugenie experienced a progressive physical weakening, which she lived in silence and humility – a life totally centered on Christ. She received the Eucharist for the last time on March 9, 1898 and on the 10th, she gently passed over to the Lord. She was beatified by Pope Paul VI on February 9, 1975 and canonized by Pope Benedict XVI on June 3, 2007 in Rome.

– Copyright © Libreria Editrice Vaticana

 

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

_____________________________

Thursday of the Fourth week of Lent

10 March 2016

Saints of the day

The Forty Martyrs of Sebaste († c. 320)

Santi_Quaranta_Martiri_di_Sebaste

THE FORTY MARTYRS OF SEBASTE
(† c. 320)

        The forty martyrs were soldiers quartered at Sebaste in Armenia, about the year 320. When their legion was ordered to offer sacrifice they separated themselves from the rest and formed a company of martyrs. After they had been torn by scourges and iron hooks they were chained together and led to a lingering death.

It was a cruel winter, and they were condemned to lie naked on the icy surface of a pond in the open air till they were frozen to death. But they ran undismayed to the place of their combat, joyfully stripped off their garments, and with one voice besought God to keep their Tanks unbroken. “Forty,” they cried, “we have come to combat: grant that forty may be crowned.” There were warm baths hard by, ready for any one amongst them who would deny Christ.

        The soldiers who watched saw angels descending with thirty-nine crowns, and, while he wondered at the deficiency in the number, one of the confessors lost heart, renounced his faith, and, crawling to the fire, died body and soul at the spot where he expected relief. But the soldier was inspired to confess Christ and take his place, and again the number of forty was complete.

They remained steadfast while their limbs grew stiff and frozen, and died one by one. Among the Forty there was a young soldier who held nut longest against the cold, and when the officers came to cart away the dead bodies they found him still breathing. They were moved with pity, and wanted to leave him alive in the hope that he would still change his mind. But his mother stood by, and ‘this valiant woman could not bear to see her son separated from the band of martyrs. She exhorted him to persevere, and lifted his frozen body into the cart. He was just able to make a sign of recognition, and was borne away, to be thrown into the flames with the dead bodies of his brethren.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

 

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

______________________________

PLEASE JOIN

DAILY MASS & SUNDAY MASS

READ

DAILY GOSPEL OF THE LORD JESUS

with

DAILY COMMENTARY OF THE DAY

and

SAINTS OF THE DAY

ALSO READ

NEWSLETTER IN THAI

From

SAINT FRANCIS XAVIER NEWSLETTER IN THAI

THANK YOU

___________________________________

“Go into the whole world and proclaim the Gospel to every creature.”

Mark 16:15-20

*********************************************

“I am with you always, until the end of the age.”

Matthew 28:20.

***********************************************

He guides me in right paths
for his name’s sake.

Even though I walk in the dark valley
I fear no evil; for you are at my side
with your rod and your staff
that give me courage.

Psalms 23(22):1-3a.3b-4.5.6. 

***************************************

Be merciful, just as your Father is merciful

****************************

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s