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Monday, January 2nd. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St John 1:19-28.


Feria in Christmas Weekday (January 2nd)

2 January 2017

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ

“I baptize with water; but there is one among you whom you do not recognize,

the one who is coming after me, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to untie.”

baptism pppas0150

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint John 1:19-28.

This is the testimony of John. When the Jews from Jerusalem sent priests and Levites to him to ask him, “Who are you?”
he admitted and did not deny it, but admitted, “I am not the Messiah.”
So they asked him, “What are you then? Are you Elijah?” And he said, “I am not.” “Are you the Prophet?” He answered, “No.”
So they said to him, “Who are you, so we can give an answer to those who sent us? What do you have to say for yourself?”
He said: “I am ‘the voice of one crying out in the desert, “Make straight the way of the Lord,”‘ as Isaiah the prophet said.”
Some Pharisees were also sent.
They asked him, “Why then do you baptize if you are not the Messiah or Elijah or the Prophet?”
John answered them, “I baptize with water; but there is one among you whom you do not recognize,
the one who is coming after me, whose sandal strap I am not worthy to untie.”
This happened in Bethany across the Jordan, where John was baptizing.

Copyright © Confraternity of Christian Doctrine,USCCB

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

Image: From Bible Hub

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THANK YOU

National Catholic Broadcasting Council

Daily TV Mass

YouTube

by

Bishop Gary Gordon

Celebrates Daily Mass from Loretto Abbey in Toronto

of

Daily TV Mass Monday, January 2, 2017

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Feria in Christmas Weekday (January 2nd)

2 January 2017

Saints of the day

St. Basil the Great,

Bishop and Doctor of the Church († 379)

san_basilio_magno_l

SAINT BASIL THE GREAT
Bishop and Doctor of the Church
(† 379)

         St. Basil was born in Asia Minor. Two of his brothers became bishops, and, together with his mother and sister, are honored as Saints.

        He studied with great success at Athens, where he formed with St. Gregory Nazianzen the most tender friendship. He then taught oratory; but dreading the honors of the world, he gave up all, and became the father of the monastic life in the East.

The Arian heretics, supported by the court, were then persecuting the Church; and Basil was summoned from his retirement by his bishop to give aid against them. His energy and zeal soon mitigated the disorders of the Church, and his solid and eloquent words silenced the heretics.

        On the death of Eusebius, he was chosen Bishop of Cæsarea. His commanding character, his firmness and energy, his learning and eloquence, and not less his humility and the exceeding austerity of his life, made him a model for bishops.

        When St. Basil was required to admit the Arians to Communion, the prefect, finding that soft words had no effect, said to him, “Are you mad, that you resist the will before which the whole world bows? Do you not dread the wrath of the emperor, nor exile, nor death?” “No,” said Basil calmly; “he who has nothing to lose need not dread loss of goods; you cannot exile me, for the whole earth is my home; as for death, it would be the greatest kindness you could bestow upon me; torments cannot harm me: one blow would end my frail life and my sufferings together.” “Never,” said the prefect, “has any one dared to address me thus.” “Perhaps,” suggested Basil, “you never before measured your strength with a Christian bishop.” The emperor desisted from his commands.

        St. Basil’s whole life was one of suffering. He lived amid jealousies and misunderstandings and seeming disappointments. But he sowed the seed which bore goodly fruit in the next generation, and was God’s instrument in beating back the Arian and other heretics in the East, and restoring the spirit of discipline and fervor in the Church.

        He died in 379, and is venerated as a Doctor of the Church.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

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Feria in Christmas Weekday (January 2nd)

2 January 2017

Saints of the day

St. Gregory Nazianzen,

Bishop and Doctor of the Church († c. 390)

san_gregorio_nazianzeno_c

Saint Gregory Nazianzen
Bishop and Doctor of the Church
(c. 303 – c. 390)

       St. Gregory was born near Nazianzus, in Cappadocia, and about 330 AD. He followed the monastic way of life for some years.  Saint Gregory and Saint Basil were life-long friends.

       He was ordained priest, and became Bishop of Constantinople in 379, when the Arian controversy was at itsheight. He was forced to retire to Nazianzus, where he died on 25 January 389, or 390.

       His learning and his powers of oratory were remarkable, and he was called The Theologian.

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The Weekday Missal

God our Father, you inspired the Church
with the example and teaching of your saints Basil and Gregory.
In humility may we come to know your truth
and put it into action with faith and love.

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

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Feria in Christmas Weekday (January 2nd)

2 January 2017

Saints of the day

St. Macarius of Alexandria,

anchorite († 394)

san_macario_lalessandrino

SAINT MACARIUS OF ALEXANDRIA
Anchorite

(† 394)

     Macarius when a youth left his fruit-stall at Alexandria to join the great St. Antony. The patriarch, warned by a miracle of his disciple’s sanctity, named him the heir of his virtues.

        His life was one long conflict with self. “I am tormenting my tormentor,” replied he to one who met him bent double with a basket of sand in the heat of the day. “Whenever I am slothful and idle, I am pestered by desires for distant travel.”

     When he was quite worn out he returned to his cell. Since sleep at times overpowered him, he kept watch for twenty days and nights; being about to faint, he entered his cell and slept, but henceforth slept only at will. A gnat stung him; he killed it. In revenge for this softness he remained naked in a marsh till his body was covered with noxious bites and he was recognized only by his voice. Once when thirsty he received a present of grapes, but passed them untouched to a hermit who was toiling in the heat. This one gave them to a third, who handed them to a fourth; thus the grapes went the round of the desert and returned to Macarius, who thanked God for his brethren’s abstinence.

Macarius saw demons assailing the hermits at prayer. They put their fingers into the mouths of some, and made them yawn. They closed the eyes of others, and walked upon them when asleep. They placed vain and sensual images before many of the brethren, and then mocked those who were captivated by them. None vanquished the devils effectually save those who by constant vigilance repelled them at once. Macarius visited one hermit daily for four months, but never could speak to him, as he was always in prayer; so he called him an ” angel on earth.”

   After being many years Superior, Macarius fled in disguise to St. Pachomius, to begin again as his novice; but St. Pachomius, instructed by a vision, bad, rim return to his brethren, who loved him as their father. In his old age, thinking nature tamed, he determined to spend five days alone in prayer. On the third day the cell seemed on fire, and Macarius came forth. God permitted this delusion, he said, lest he be ensnared by pride.

        At the age of seventy-three he was driven into exile and brutally outraged by the Arian heretics. He died A. D. 394.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

 

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2016

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MERRY CHRISTMASS

and

HAPPY NEW YEAR 2017

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