"สารวัด" ของ วัดนักบุญฟรังซีสเซเวียร์ สามเสน

Author Archive

Sunday, October 12th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Matthew 22:1-14.


Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

12 October 2014

                                                                                        “ Many are invited, but few are chosen.”1 aa stdas0151Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Matthew 22:1-14.

Jesus again in reply spoke to the chief priests and the elders of the people in parables saying,
“The kingdom of heaven may be likened to a king who gave a wedding feast for his son.
He dispatched his servants to summon the invited guests to the feast, but they refused to come.
A second time he sent other servants, saying, ‘Tell those invited: “Behold, I have prepared my banquet, my calves and fattened cattle are killed, and everything is ready; come to the feast.”‘
Some ignored the invitation and went away, one to his farm, another to his business.
The rest laid hold of his servants, mistreated them, and killed them.
The king was enraged and sent his troops, destroyed those murderers, and burned their city.
Then he said to his servants, ‘The feast is ready, but those who were invited were not worthy to come.
Go out, therefore, into the main roads and invite to the feast whomever you find.’
The servants went out into the streets and gathered all they found, bad and good alike, and the hall was filled with guests.
But when the king came in to meet the guests he saw a man there not dressed in a wedding garment.
He said to him, ‘My friend, how is it that you came in here without a wedding garment?’ But he was reduced to silence.
Then the king said to his attendants, ‘Bind his hands and feet, and cast him into the darkness outside, where there will be wailing and grinding of teeth.’
Many are invited, but few are chosen.”

########################################################################################

Twenty-eighth Sunday in Ordinary Time – Year A

12 October 2014

 Saint of the day

St. Wilfrid, Bishop (c. 634-709) 1 St Wilfrid untitled

SAINT WILFRID
Bishop
(c. 634-709)

        “A quick walker, expert at all good works, with never a sour face”-such was the great St. Wilfrid, whose glory it was to secure the happy links which bound England to Rome.

        He was born about the year 634, and was trained by the Celtic monks at Lindisfarne in the peculiar rites and usages of the British Church. Yet even as a boy Wilfrid longed for perfect conformity in discipline, as in doctrine, with the Holy See, and at the first chance set off himself for Rome. On his return he founded at Ripon a strictly Roman monastery, under the rule of St. Benedict.  
        In the year 664 he was elected Bishop of Lindisfarne, and five years later was transferred to the see of York. He had to combat the passions of wicked kings, the cowardice of worldly prelates, the errors of holy men. He was twice exiled and once imprisoned; yet the battle which he fought was won. He swept away the abuses of many years and a too national system, and substituted instead a vigorous Catholic discipline, modelled and dependent on Rome.

        He died October 12, 709, and at his death was heard the sweet melody of the angels conducting his soul to Christ.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894] 

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014


Saturday, October 11th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Luke 11:27-28.


Saturday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

11 October 2014

“Blessed is the womb that carried you and the breasts at which you nursed.”

imagesBF8MDTWNwwwHoly Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 11:27-28.

While Jesus was speaking, a woman from the crowd called out and said to him, “Blessed is the womb that carried you and the breasts at which you nursed.”
He replied, “Rather, blessed are those who hear the word of God and observe it.”

#########################################################################################

Saturday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

11 October 2014

St. Tarachus and his Companions, Martyrs († 304)

1 a Santi_Taraco_Probo_e_Andronico_B

SAINT TARACHUS
and his Companions
Martyrs († 304)

        In the year 304, Tarachus, Probus, and Andronicus, differing in age and nationality, but united in the bonds of faith, being denounced as Christians to Numerian, Governor of Cilicia, were arrested at Pompeiopolis, and conducted to Tharsis. They underwent a first examination in that town, after which their limbs were torn with iron hooks, and they were taken back to prison covered with wounds. Being afterwards led to Mopsuestia, they were submitted to a second examination, ending in a manner equally cruel as the first. They underwent a third examination at Anazarbis, followed by greater torments still.

        The governor, unable to shake their constancy, had them kept imprisoned that he might torture them further at the approaching games. They were borne to the amphitheatre, but the most ferocious animals, on being let loose on them, came crouching to their feet and licked their wounds. The judge, reproaching the jailers with connivance, ordered the martyrs to be despatched by the gladiators.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014


Friday, October 10th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Luke 11:15-26.


Friday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

10 October 2014

 “Every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste and house will fall against house.”

1 demon stdas0160

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 11:15-26.

When Jesus had driven out a demon, some of the crowd said: “By the power of Beelzebul, the prince of demons, he drives out demons.”
Others, to test him, asked him for a sign from heaven.
But he knew their thoughts and said to them, “Every kingdom divided against itself will be laid waste and house will fall against house.
And if Satan is divided against himself, how will his kingdom stand? For you say that it is by Beelzebul that I drive out demons.
If I, then, drive out demons by Beelzebul, by whom do your own people drive them out? Therefore they will be your judges.
But if it is by the finger of God that (I) drive out demons, then the kingdom of God has come upon you.
When a strong man fully armed guards his palace, his possessions are safe.
But when one stronger than he attacks and overcomes him, he takes away the armor on which he relied and distributes the spoils.
Whoever is not with me is against me, and whoever does not gather with me scatters.
When an unclean spirit goes out of someone, it roams through arid regions searching for rest but, finding none, it says, ‘I shall return to my home from which I came.’
But upon returning, it finds it swept clean and put in order.
Then it goes and brings back seven other spirits more wicked than itself who move in and dwell there, and the last condition of that person is worse than the first.”

########################################################################################

Friday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

10 October 2014

Saint of the day

St. Francis Borgia, Priest (1510-1572)

1 a420px-San_Francisco_de_Borja

SAINT FRANCIS BORGIA
Priest
(1510-1572)

        Francis Borgia, Duke of Gandia and Captain-General of Catalonia, was one of the handsomest, richest, and most honored nobles in Spain, when, in 1539, there was laid upon him the sad duty of escorting the remains of his sovereign, Queen Isabella, to the royal burying-place at Granada. The coffin had to be opened for him that he might verify the body before it was placed in the tomb, and so foul a sight met his eyes that he vowed never again to serve a sovereign who could suffer so base a change.

        It was some years before he could follow the call of his Lord; at length he entered the Society of Jesus to cut himself off from any chance of dignity or preferment. But his Order chose him to be its head. The Turks were threatening Christendom, and St. Pius V. sent his nephew to gather Christian princes into a league for its defence. The holy Pope chose Francis to accompany him, and, worn out though he was, the Saint obeyed at once. The fatigues of the embassy exhausted what little life was left.

        St. Francis died on his return to Rome, October 10, 1572.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014


PSALMS


1 พระหฤทย dsc_00101

Most Sacred Heart of Jesus

at Saint Francis Xavier Catholic Church,

Samsen, Bangkok, THAILAND

THE DIVINE SHEPHERD PSALM 23
The Lord is my Shepherd, I shall not want. He makes me lie down in green pastures;
He leads me beside still waters;
He restores my soul. He leads me in right paths For His Name\’s sake.
Even though I walk through the darkest valley, I fear no evil;
For you are with me;
Your rod and Your staff – they comfort me.
You prepare a table before me in the presence of my enemies, You anoint my head with oil;
My cup overflows.
Surely goodness and mercy shall follow me All the days of my life. And I shall dwell in the house of the Lord My whole life long.
[Psalm 23:1-6; NRSV]    …. Psalm 23 is perhaps the most read Psalm.
########################################################################################

Psalms 98(97):1.3cd-4.5-6. ::::::
Sing to the LORD a new song,
For he has done wondrous deeds;
His right hand has won victory for him,
His holy arm.

All the ends of the earth have seen
The salvation by our God.
Sing joyfully to the LORD, all you lands;
Break into song; sing praise.

Sing praise to the LORD with the harp,
With the harp and melodious song.
With trumpets and the sound of the horn
Sing joyfully before the King, the LORD


Thursday, October 9th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Luke 11:5-13.


Thursday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

9 October 2014

“For everyone who asks, receives; and the one who seeks, finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.”

1 a stdas0159

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 11:5-13.

Jesus said to his disciples: “Suppose one of you has a friend to whom he goes at midnight and says, ‘Friend, lend me three loaves of bread,
for a friend of mine has arrived at my house from a journey and I have nothing to offer him,’
and he says in reply from within, ‘Do not bother me; the door has already been locked and my children and I are already in bed. I cannot get up to give you anything.’
I tell you, if he does not get up to give him the loaves because of their friendship, he will get up to give him whatever he needs because of his persistence.
And I tell you, ask and you will receive; seek and you will find; knock and the door will be opened to you.
For everyone who asks, receives; and the one who seeks, finds; and to the one who knocks, the door will be opened.
What father among you would hand his son a snake when he asks for a fish?
Or hand him a scorpion when he asks for an egg?
If you then, who are wicked, know how to give good gifts to your children, how much more will the Father in heaven give the holy Spirit to those who ask him?”

########################################################################################

Thursday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

9 October 2014

Saints of the day

St. Louis Bertrand, Dominican (1526-1581)

1 a San_Luigi-Ludovico-Bertran

SAINT LOUIS BERTRAND
(Dominican)
(1526-1581)

        St. Louis Bertrand was born at Valencia, in Spain, in 1526, of the same family as St. Vincent Ferrer. In 1545, after severe trials, he was professed in the Dominican Order, and at the age of twenty-five was made master of novices, and trained up many great servants of God.

        When the plague broke out in Valencia he devoted himself to the sick and dying, and with his own hands buried the dead. In 1562 he obtained leave to embark for the American mission, and there converted vast multitudes to the Faith. He was favored with the gift of miracles, and while preaching in his native Spanish was understood in various languages.

        After seven years he returned to Spain, to plead the cause of the oppressed Indians, but he was not permitted to return and labor among them. He spent his remaining days toiling in his own country, till at length, in 1580, he was carried from the pulpit in the Cathedral at Valencia to the bed from whence he never rose.

        He died on the day he had foretold-October 9, 1581.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

########################################################################################

Thursday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

9 October 2014

Saints of the day

St. John Leonardi, Priest (c. 1541-1609)

1 a San_Giovanni_Leonardi

SAINT JOHN LEONARDI
Priest

(c.1541-1609)

        St. John Leonardi was born in Tuscany about 1541. He was ordained priest, and founded a community to teach the young and to instruct adults against the Protestant Reformers.

        He went to Rome and worked with Philip Neri for a time. In preparing priests for mission work, he laid the foundations of the Congregation for the Propagation of the Faith.

        He died in 1609.

The Weekday Missal (1975)

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

########################################################################################

Thursday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

9 October 2014

Saints of the day

Bl. John Henry Newman, priest, founder of a religious community, theologian († 1890)

1 a Venerabile_Giovanni_Enrico_Newman_B

Blessed John Henry Newman
Priest, founder of a religious community, theologian

(1801-1890)

        This day that has brought us together here in Birmingham is a most auspicious one. In the first place, it is the Lord’s Day, Sunday, the day when our Lord Jesus Christ rose from the dead and changed the course of human history for ever, offering new life and hope to all who live in darkness and in the shadow of death. (…)Yet there is another, more joyful reason why this is an auspicious day for Great Britain, for the Midlands, for Birmingham. It is the day that sees Cardinal John Henry Newman formally raised to the altars and declared Blessed.(…)

        England has a long tradition of martyr saints, whose courageous witness has sustained and inspired the Catholic community here for centuries. Yet it is right and fitting that we should recognize today the holiness of a confessor, a son of this nation who, while not called to shed his blood for the Lord, nevertheless bore eloquent witness to him in the course of a long life devoted to the priestly ministry, and especially to preaching, teaching, and writing. He is worthy to take his place in a long line of saints and scholars from these islands, Saint Bede, Saint Hilda, Saint Aelred, Blessed Duns Scotus, to name but a few. In Blessed John Henry, that tradition of gentle scholarship, deep human wisdom and profound love for the Lord has borne rich fruit, as a sign of the abiding presence of the Holy Spirit deep within the heart of God’s people, bringing forth abundant gifts of holiness.

        Cardinal Newman’s motto, Cor ad cor loquitur, or “Heart speaks unto heart”, gives us an insight into his understanding of the Christian life as a call to holiness, experienced as the profound desire of the human heart to enter into intimate communion with the Heart of God. He reminds us that faithfulness to prayer gradually transforms us into the divine likeness. As he wrote in one of his many fine sermons, “a habit of prayer, the practice of turning to God and the unseen world in every season, in every place, in every emergency – prayer, I say, has what may be called a natural effect in spiritualizing and elevating the soul. A man is no longer what he was before; gradually … he has imbibed a new set of ideas, and become imbued with fresh principles” (Parochial and Plain Sermons, iv, 230-231). Today’s Gospel tells us that no one can be the servant of two masters (cf. Lk 16:13), and Blessed John Henry’s teaching on prayer explains how the faithful Christian is definitively taken into the service of the one true Master, who alone has a claim to our unconditional devotion (cf. Mt 23:10). Newman helps us to understand what this means for our daily lives: he tells us that our divine Master has assigned a specific task to each one of us, a “definite service”, committed uniquely to every single person: “I have my mission”, he wrote, “I am a link in a chain, a bond of connexion between persons. He has not created me for naught. I shall do good, I shall do his work; I shall be an angel of peace, a preacher of truth in my own place … if I do but keep his commandments and serve him in my calling” (Meditations and Devotions, 301-2).

        The definite service to which Blessed John Henry was called involved applying his keen intellect and his prolific pen to many of the most pressing “subjects of the day”. His insights into the relationship between faith and reason, into the vital place of revealed religion in civilized society, and into the need for a broadly-based and wide-ranging approach to education were not only of profound importance for Victorian England, but continue today to inspire and enlighten many all over the world. I would like to pay particular tribute to his vision for education, which has done so much to shape the ethos that is the driving force behind Catholic schools and colleges today. Firmly opposed to any reductive or utilitarian approach, he sought to achieve an educational environment in which intellectual training, moral discipline and religious commitment would come together. The project to found a Catholic University in Ireland provided him with an opportunity to develop his ideas on the subject, and the collection of discourses that he published as The Idea of a University holds up an ideal from which all those engaged in academic formation can continue to learn. And indeed, what better goal could teachers of religion set themselves than Blessed John Henry’s famous appeal for an intelligent, well-instructed laity: “I want a laity, not arrogant, not rash in speech, not disputatious, but men who know their religion, who enter into it, who know just where they stand, who know what they hold and what they do not, who know their creed so well that they can give an account of it, who know so much of history that they can defend it” (The Present Position of Catholics in England, ix, 390). On this day when the author of those words is raised to the altars, I pray that, through his intercession and example, all who are engaged in the task of teaching and catechesis will be inspired to greater effort by the vision he so clearly sets before us.

        While it is John Henry Newman’s intellectual legacy that has understandably received most attention in the vast literature devoted to his life and work, I prefer on this occasion to conclude with a brief reflection on his life as a priest, a pastor of souls. The warmth and humanity underlying his appreciation of the pastoral ministry is beautifully expressed in another of his famous sermons: “Had Angels been your priests, my brethren, they could not have condoled with you, sympathized with you, have had compassion on you, felt tenderly for you, and made allowances for you, as we can; they could not have been your patterns and guides, and have led you on from your old selves into a new life, as they can who come from the midst of you” (“Men, not Angels: the Priests of the Gospel”, Discourses to Mixed Congregations, 3). He lived out that profoundly human vision of priestly ministry in his devoted care for the people of Birmingham during the years that he spent at the Oratory he founded, visiting the sick and the poor, comforting the bereaved, caring for those in prison. No wonder that on his death so many thousands of people lined the local streets as his body was taken to its place of burial not half a mile from here. One hundred and twenty years later, great crowds have assembled once again to rejoice in the Church’s solemn recognition of the outstanding holiness of this much-loved father of souls. What better way to express the joy of this moment than by turning to our heavenly Father in heartfelt thanksgiving, praying in the words that Blessed John Henry Newman placed on the lips of the choirs of angels in heaven:

Praise to the Holiest in the height
And in the depth be praise;
In all his words most wonderful,
Most sure in all his ways!

(The Dream of Gerontius).

(Homily of his holiness Benedict XVI – Mass with the beatification of venerable cardinal John Henry Newman – Birmingham – Sunday, 19 September 2010)

- Copyright © Libreria Editrice Vaticana

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014

########################################################################################

Thursday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

9 October 2014

Saints of the day

St. Dionysius and his Companions, Martyrs

1 a San_Dionigi_e_compagni

SAINT DIONYSIUS
and his Companions
Martyrs
(3rd century)

        Of all the Roman missionaries sent into Gaul, St. Dionysius carried the Faith the furthest into the country, fixing his see at Paris, and by him and his disciples the sees of Chartres, Senlis, Meaux, and Cologne were erected in the fourth century.

        During the persecution of Valerian he was arrested and thrown into prison, and after remaining there for some time was beheaded, together with St. Rusticus, a priest, and Eleutherius, a deacon.

Lives of the Saints, by Alban Butler, Benziger Bros. ed. [1894]

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014


Wednesday, October 8th. Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to St Luke 11:1-4.


Wednesday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

8 October 2014

“Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples.”

1 teacher

Holy Gospel of Jesus Christ according to Saint Luke 11:1-4.

Jesus was praying in a certain place, and when he had finished, one of his disciples said to him, “Lord, teach us to pray just as John taught his disciples.”
He said to them, “When you pray, say: Father, hallowed be your name, your kingdom come.
Give us each day our daily bread
and forgive us our sins for we ourselves forgive everyone in debt to us, and do not subject us to the final test.”

########################################################################################

Wednesday of the Twenty-seventh week in Ordinary Time

8 October 2014

Saint of the day

St. Demetrius, Martyr († c. 306)

1 San_Demetrio_di_Tessalonica

SAINT DEMETRIUS OF SIRMIUM
Martyr

(† c. 306)

        Saint Demetrius was born to a wealthy, noble family and raised Christian. He was a soldier and a Deacon. He was raised to the rank of Duke of Thessaly by the Emperor Maximian. But when he was found to be a Christian he was arrested and imprisoned in a bath-house. He was run through with spears c.306 at Sirmium (in modern Serbia).

        St. Demetrius was extremely popular in the Middle Ages and was reported to have appeared during a battle in 586, centuries after his death to help defend Thessalonika.
        Over 200 churches in the Balkans are known to have been dedicated to him. His relics were said to emit holy oil.

©Evangelizo.org 2001-2014


1 Corinthians 13. Faith, Hope, Love, these three; but the greatest of these is Love.


AGAPE

This chapter of Corinthians is one of a number of definitional sources for the word AGAPE

when used to refer to divine love.

LOVE

GS2

LOVE

1 Corinthians 13.

(13.1)
 If I could speak all the human and angelic tongues, but had no love, I would only be sounding brass or a clanging cymbal.

(13.2)
 If I had the gift of prophecy, knowing secret things with all kinds of knowledge, and had faith great enough to remove mountains, but had no love, I would be nothing.

(13.3)
 If I gave everything I had to the poor, and even give up my body to be burned, if I am without love, It would be of no value to me.

(13.4)
Love is patient, kind, without envy. It is not boastful or arrogant.

(13.5)
It is not ill mannered nor does it seek its own interest.
Love overcome anger and forgets offenses.

(13.6)
 It does not take delight in wrong, but rejoices in truth.

(13.7)
 Love excuses everything, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things.

 
(13.8)
 Love will never end. Prophecies may cease, tongues be silent and knowledge disappear.

(13.9)
For knowledge gasps something of the truth and prophecy as well.

(13.10)
And when what is perfect comes, everything imperfect will pass away.

(13.11)
 When I was a child I thought and reasoned like a child, but when I grew up, I gave up childish ways.

(13.12)
 Likewise, at present we see dimly as in a mirror, but then it shall be face to face. Now we know in part, but then I will know as I am known. 

(13.13).
Now we have faith, hope and love, these three, but the greatest of these is love.


The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Solemnity .


The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Solemnity .

2assumption-st-francis-dsc_0005

AUGUST 15 300px-Baroque_Rubens_Assumption-of-Virgin-3The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary – Solemnity .

15 August 2014. Holy Day of Obligation.

The Assumption of the Virgin Mary into Heaven, informally known as The Assumption, according to the beliefs of the Roman Catholic Church, Eastern Orthodoxy, Oriental Orthodoxy, and parts of Anglicanism, was the bodily taking up of the Virgin Mary into Heaven at the end of her earthly life.

The Roman Catholic Church teaches as dogma that the Virgin Mary “having completed the course of her earthly life, was assumed body and soul into heavenly glory.” This doctrine was dogmatically defined by Pope Pius XII on November 1, 1950, in the Apostolic Constitution Munificentissimus Deus by exercising papal infallibility. While the Catholic Church and Eastern Orthodox Church believe in the Dormition of the Theotokos, which is the same as the Assumption, the death of Mary has not been dogmatically defined.

In Munificentissimus Deus (item 39) Pope Pius XII pointed to the Book of Genesis (3:15) as scriptural support for the dogma in terms of Mary’s victory over sin and death as also reflected in 1 Corinthians 15:54: “then shall come to pass the saying that is written, Death is swallowed up in victory”.

In the churches which observe it, the Assumption is a major feast day, commonly celebrated on August 15. In many Catholic countries, the feast is also marked as a Holy Day of Obligation.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia.


Easter (Old English Ēostre), also called the Pasch or Pascha


Easter (Old English Ēostre), also called the Pasch or Pascha

1 360px-Resurrection_(24)

g4

dsc_00061

Easter (Old English Ēostre), also called the Pasch or Pascha

Easter (Old English Ēostre), also called the Pasch or Pascha (the two latter names derived, through Latin: Pascha and Greek Πάσχα Paskha, from Hebrew: פֶּסַח‎ Pesaḥ), or Resurrection Sunday, is a festival and holiday celebrating the Resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead, described in the New Testament as having occurred three days after his crucifixion by Romans at Calvary.  It is the culmination of the Passion of Christ, preceded by Lent, a forty-day period of fasting, prayer, and penance.

The last week of Lent is called Holy Week, and it contains the days of the Easter Triduum, including Maundy Thursday (also known as Holy Thursday), commemorating the Last Supper and its preceding foot washing, as well as Good Friday, commemorating the crucifixion and death of Jesus. Easter is followed by a fifty-day period called Eastertide, or the Easter Season, ending with Pentecost Sunday.

Easter is a moveable feast, meaning it is not fixed in relation to the civil calendar. The First Council of Nicaea (325) established the date of Easter as the first Sunday after the full moon (the Paschal Full Moon) following the March equinox. Ecclesiastically, the equinox is reckoned to be on 21 March (although the astronomical equinox occurs on 20 March in most years), and the “Full Moon” is not necessarily on the astronomically correct date. The date of Easter therefore varies from 22 March to 25 April inclusive. Eastern Christianity bases its calculations on the Julian calendar, whose 21 March corresponds, during the 21st century, to 3 April in the Gregorian calendar, and in which therefore the celebration of Easter varies between 4 April and 8 May.

Easter is linked to the Jewish Passover by much of its symbolism, as well as by its position in the calendar. In many languages, the words for “Easter” and “Passover” are identical or very similar. Easter customs vary across the Christian world, and include sunrise services, exclaiming the Paschal greeting, clipping the church, and decorating Easter eggs, a symbol of the empty tomb. The Easter lily, a symbol of the resurrection, traditionally decorates the chancel area of churches on this day and for the rest of Eastertide. Additional customs that have become associated with Easter and are observed by both Christians and some non-Christians include egg hunting, the Easter Bunny, and Easter parades. There are also various traditional Easter foods that vary regionally.

The New Testament teaches that the resurrection of Jesus, which Easter celebrates, is a foundation of the Christian faith. The resurrection established Jesus as the powerful Son of God and is cited as proof that God will judge the world in righteousness. God has given Christians “a new birth into a living hope through the resurrection of Jesus Christ from the dead”. Christians, through faith in the working of God are spiritually resurrected with Jesus so that they may walk in a new way of life.

Easter is linked to the Passover and Exodus from Egypt recorded in the Old Testament through the Last Supper and crucifixion that preceded the resurrection. According to the New Testament, Jesus gave the Passover meal a new meaning, as he prepared himself and his disciples for his death in the upper room during the Last Supper. He identified the matzah and cup of wine as his body soon to be sacrificed and his blood soon to be shed. Paul states, “Get rid of the old yeast that you may be a new batch without yeast—as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed”; this refers to the Passover requirement to have no yeast in the house and to the allegory of Jesus as the Paschal lamb.

One interpretation of the Gospel of John is that Jesus, as the Passover lamb, was crucified at roughly the same time as the Passover lambs were being slain in the temple, on the afternoon of Nisan 14. The scriptural instructions specify that the lamb is to be slain “between the two evenings”, that is, at twilight. By the Roman period, however, the sacrifices were performed in the mid-afternoon. Josephus, Jewish War 6.10.1/423 (“They sacrifice from the ninth to the eleventh hour”). Philo, Special Laws 2.27/145 (“Many myriads of victims from noon till eventide are offered by the whole people”).

This interpretation, however, is inconsistent with the chronology in the Synoptic Gospels. It assumes that text literally translated “the preparation of the Passover” in John 19:14 refers to Nisan 14 (Preparation Day for the Passover) and not necessarily to Yom Shishi (Friday, Preparation Day for the Passover week Sabbath) and that the priests’ desire to be ritually pure in order to “eat the Passover” refers to eating the Passover lamb, not to the public offerings made during the days of Unleavened Bread.
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia : Easter


THE PASSION


THE PASSION

1 330px-Christ_Carrying_the_Cross_1580

1 330px-Stom,_Matthias_-_Christ_Crowned_with_Thorns_-_c__1633-1639

THE PASSION

In Christianity, the Passion  is the short final period in the life of Jesus covering his visit to Jerusalem and leading to his execution by crucifixion, an event central to Christian beliefs.

It begins with his triumphal entry into Jerusalem and includes his Last Supper, Agony in the Garden and his arrest and trial. Those parts of the four Gospels that describe these events, as well as the non-canonical Gospel of Peter, are known as the “Passion narratives”. In the liturgical calendar, the Passion is commemorated in Holy Week, beginning on Palm Sunday and ending on Easter Saturday.

The word passion has since taken on a more general application and now may also apply to accounts of the suffering and death of Christian martyrs, sometimes using the Latin form passio.

The accounts of the Passion are found in the four canonical gospels, Matthew, Mark, Luke and John. Three of these, Matthew, Mark, and Luke, known as the Synoptic Gospels, give very similar accounts. The Gospel of John includes additional details. The events include: Triumphal entry into Jerusalem, Cleansing of the Temple,

The conspiracy against Jesus by the Jewish chief priests and the teachers of the law.

A meal a few days before Passover. A woman anoints Jesus. He says that for this she will always be remembered.

In Jerusalem, the Last Supper shared by Jesus and his disciples. Jesus gives final instructions, predicts his betrayal, and tells them all to remember him.

On the path to Gethsemane after the meal. Jesus tells them they will all fall away that night; after Peter protests he will not, Jesus says Peter will deny him three times before the cock crows.

Gethsemane, later that night. As the disciples rest, Jesus prays; then Judas Iscariot leads in either “a detachment of soldiers and some officials from the chief priests and Pharisees” (accompanied according to Luke’s Gospel by the chief priests and elders), or a “large crowd armed with swords and clubs, sent from the chief priests and elders of the people,” which arrests Jesus; all his disciples run away.

The high priest’s palace, later that night. The arresting party brings Jesus to the Sanhedrin (Jewish supreme court); according to Luke’s Gospel, Jesus is beaten by his Jewish guards prior to his examination; the court examines him, in the course of which, according to John’s Gospel, Jesus is struck in the face by one of the Jewish officials; the court determine he deserves to die (see Sanhedrin Trial of Jesus). According to Matthew’s Gospel, the court then “spat in his face and struck him with their fists.” They then send him to Pontius Pilate.

The courtyard outside the high priest’s palace, the same time. Peter has followed Jesus and joined the mob awaiting Jesus’ fate; they suspect he is a sympathizer, so Peter denies he knows Jesus. Suddenly the cock crows and Peter remembers what Jesus had said.

The governor’s palace, early morning. Pilate, the Roman governor, examines Jesus, decides he is innocent; the Jewish leaders and the crowd demand Jesus’ death; Pilate gives them the choice of saving Barabbas, a criminal, or saving Jesus. In response to the screaming mob Pilate sends Jesus out to be crucified. According to the Gospel of Matthew, Judas, the betrayer, is filled with remorse and tries to return the money he was paid for betraying Jesus. When the high priests say that that is his affair, Judas throws the money into the temple, goes off, and hangs himself.

Golgotha, a hill outside Jerusalem, later morning through mid afternoon. Jesus is crucified and dies.

During the arrest in Gethsemane, someone (Peter according to John) takes a sword and cuts off the ear of the high priest’s servant, Malchus. According to the synoptic gospels, the high priest who examines Jesus is Caiaphas; in John, Jesus is also interrogated by Annas, Caiaiphas’ father-in-law.

The Gospel of Luke states that Pilate sends Jesus to be judged by Herod Antipas because as a Galilean he is under his jurisdiction. Herod is excited at first to see Jesus and hopes Jesus will perform a miracle for him; he asks Jesus several questions but Jesus does not answer. Herod then mocks him and sends him back to Pilate after giving him an “elegant” robe to wear.

All the Gospels have a man named Barabbas released by Pilate instead of Jesus. Matthew, Mark and John have Pilate offer a choice between Jesus and Barabbas to the crowd; Luke lists no choice offered by Pilate, but represents the crowd demanding his release.

In all the Gospels, Pilate asks Jesus if he is King of the Jews and Jesus replies So you say. Once condemned by Pilate, he was flogged before execution. The Canonical Gospels, except Luke, record that Jesus is then taken by the soldiers to the Praetorium where, according to Matthew and Mark, the whole contingent of soldiers has been called together. They place a purple robe on him, put a crown of thorns on his head, and according to Matthew, put a rod in his hand. They mock him by hailing him as King of the Jews, paying homage and hitting him on the head with the rod.

According to the Gospel of John, Pilate has Jesus brought out a second time, wearing the purple robe and the crown of thorns, in order to appeal his innocence before the crowd, saying “Ecce homo,” “Behold the man.” But, John represents, the priests urge the crowd to demand Jesus’ death. Pilate resigns himself to the decision, washing his hands (according to Matthew) before the people as a sign that Jesus’ blood will not be upon him.

Mark and Matthew record that Jesus is returned his own clothes, prior to being led out for execution. According to the Gospel accounts he is forced, like other victims of crucifixion, to drag his own cross to Golgotha, the location of the execution. The three Synoptic Gospels refer to a man called Simon of Cyrene who is made to carry the cross (Mark 15:21, Matthew 27:32, Luke 23:26), while in the Gospel of John (19:17) Jesus is made to carry His own cross. The Gospel of Mark gives the names of Simon’s children, Alexander and Rufus. However, the Gospel of Luke refers to Simon carrying the cross after Jesus, in that it states: “they laid hold upon one Simon, a Cyrenian, coming out of the country, and on him they laid the cross, that he might bear it after Jesus”. Luke adds that Jesus’ female followers follow, mourning his fate, but that he responds by quoting Hosea 10:8.

The Synoptic Gospels state that on arrival at Golgotha, Jesus is offered wine laced with myrrh to lessen the pain, but he refuses it. Jesus is then crucified, according to Mark, at the third hour (9 AM) the morning after the Passover meal, but according to John he is handed over to be crucified at the sixth hour (noon) the day before the Passover meal, though many resolve this by saying that the Synoptics use Jewish time, and that John uses Roman time. Pilate has a plaque fixed to Jesus’ cross inscribed, (according to John) in Hebrew, Greek and the Latin – Iesu Nazarenus Rex Iudeorum, meaning Jesus of Nazareth, King of the Jews. Mark has the plaque say simply, King of the Jews. The Gospels then state that the soldiers divide Jesus’ clothes among themselves, except for one garment for which they cast lots. The Gospel of John claims that this fulfills a prophecy from Psalms 22:18. Some of the crowd who have been following taunt Jesus, saying “He trusts in God; let God deliver him now!”, and suggest that Jesus might perform a miracle to release himself from the cross.

According to the Gospels, two thieves are also crucified, one on each side of him. According to Luke, one of the thieves reviles Jesus, while the other declares Jesus innocent and begs that he might be remembered when Jesus comes to his kingdom (see Saint Dismas).

John records that Mary, his mother, and two other women stand by the cross as does a disciple, described as the one whom Jesus loved. Jesus commits his mother to this disciple’s care. According to the synoptics, the sky becomes dark at midday and the darkness lasts for three hours, until the ninth hour when Jesus cries out Eloi, Eloi, lama sabachthani? (My God, why have you forsaken me?) The centurion standing guard, who has seen how Jesus has died, declares Jesus innocent (Luke) or Son of God (Matthew, Mark).

John also says that, as was the custom, the soldiers come and break the legs of the thieves, so that they will die faster, but that on coming to Jesus they find him already dead. A soldier pierces his side with a spear.

The various words of Jesus during the Crucifixion are collected from the different Gospel accounts as the Last Words of Christ.

From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia : Passion (Christianity)


Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.